Category Archives: science

The Universe Within and Tiktaalik, Neil Shubin at the Royal Institution

People who have a great passion for a subject are often the best speakers on it, and Neil Shubin’s enthusiasm for his work was obvious as he spoke earlier this evening at the Royal Institution. He’s a palaeontologist who believes … Continue reading

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Jim Al-Khalili, Quantum Life (how physics can revolutionise biology); and neeps

I’d thawed out the vegetarian haggis, made sure we had a neep and some tatties, and so was all ready for a Burns Night supper. Neep, incidentally, is the Scots for turnip or swede, and like many Scots words looks … Continue reading

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Sean Carroll on the Higgs, and the future of the Royal Institution

The other night the Royal Institution had one of the best speakers I have seen there for a long time – Sean Carroll on the LHC and his new book, The Particle at the End of the Universe: the hunt … Continue reading

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The Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books and Inept Guardian Competiton Question

The Royal Society Winton Prize for Science Books winner will be announced on the 26th November. The shortlist is: The Hidden Reality: Parallel Universes and the Deep Laws of the Cosmos by Brian Greene; Moonwalking with Einstein: The Art and Science of Remembering … Continue reading

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Gravity’s Engines: Caleb Scharf at the Royal Institution

Caleb Scharf  is Director of Columbia University’s Astrobiology Center, and his recent book is Gravity’s Engines: the Other Side of Black Holes; the American edition has the subtitle How Bubble-Blowing Black Holes Rule Galaxies, Stars, and Life in the Cosmos … Continue reading

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Jim Al-Khalili’s Paradox at the Royal Institution

Jim Al-Khalili’s latest book is Paradox: the nine greatest enigmas in science, and he gave a talk based upon it at the Royal Institution this evening. Probably the most well-known scientific paradox is that of Schrodinger’s Cat, where those who … Continue reading

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Imagining the past, remembering the future: Charles Fernyhough at the Royal Institution

Charles Fernyhough wrote one of my favourite popular science books, The Baby in the Mirror, a moving account of his daughter Athena’s first three years; he also gave an equally interesting talk based on the book at the Royal Institution … Continue reading

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